The Romance of Scotland in Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander

Object Details

View

Title Information
The Romance of Scotland in Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander

Name:Personal
Meeboer, Kelly
Role :Text(marcrelator)
creator

Name:Personal
Aronstein, Dr. Susan
Role :Text(marcrelator)
contributor

typeOfResource
still image
genre
Origin Information Place
Laramie, Wyoming

University of Wyoming
(keyDate="yes")
2009-05-15

Language:Text
eng

Physical Description

born digtal

abstract
Scotland has long been a location of mystery and superstition—the land and people intrigue foreigners, drawing them in, in spite of perceived dangers. Diana Gabaldon, author of Outlander and its sequels, sets her first novel in Scotland precisely for this reason. Part of the reason that the novel succeeds as a romance (and, thus, with romance readers) is its Scottish setting—people, objects, and superstitions—which perpetuates the myth of Scotland as a mysterious place. Outlander’s readers escape into the story via the main character’s escape into a magical Scotland. This escape uses traditional elements of the romance novel to acquire an audience of that genre, including a plot that centers on the love of two unlikely partners and which results in a happy ending; however, Outlander both critiques and transcends generic romance by confusing gender roles at times which enables the heroine to become the focus of the novel. Ultimately, Outlander demonstrates the ability of a novel to appeal to the romance audience while also attracting a broader audience.
note
From - Undergraduate Research Day 2009 - Celebration of Research - Abstracts
Subject
Diana Gabaldon

Subject
Outlander

Subject
gender roles

Subject
romance literature

Subject
Scotland

Related Item:series Title Information
Undergrauate Research Day 2009

Location (usage="primary display")

accessCondition:useAndReproduction
http://digital.uwyo.edu/copyright.htm
Record Information languageOfCataloging :Text(ISO639-2B)
English
:Code(ISO639-2B)
eng