Hydrologic Geochemical Correlations with Bacterial ...

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Hydrologic Geochemical Correlations with Bacterial Communities in a 52°C Hot Spring and its Outflow Channel, Thermopolis, Wyoming

Name:Personal
Barlow, Brittany
Role :Text(marcrelator)
creator

Name:Personal
Christopherson, Jared
Role :Text(marcrelator)
creator

Name:Personal
Forbis, Sabrina
Role :Text(marcrelator)
creator

Name:Personal
Gopher, Marietta
Role :Text(marcrelator)
creator

Name:Personal
Hammer, Selena
Role :Text(marcrelator)
creator

Name:Personal
Smaglik, Suzanne M.
Role :Text(marcrelator)
contributor

Name:Personal
McAllister, Steven J.
Role :Text(marcrelator)
contributor

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still image
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Origin Information Place
Laramie, Wyoming

University of Wyoming
(keyDate="yes")
2009-05-12

Language:Text
eng

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born digtal

abstract
The Big Spring in Hot Springs State Park, Thermopolis, Wyoming, flows at an average rate of about 14 million L/day at a temperature between 52 - 54°C. The spring is geologically controlled by an east-west trending fault. Water and microbial samples have been collected on a semi-regular basis from August 2008 to present. At each of 20 sites, water is tested in the field for temperature and pH. Two water samples are collected at each site. One sample is filtered (0.45 m) and the unfiltered sample is frozen for further analysis. Quantitative and semi-quantitative laboratory tests are performed on the filtered water samples. There is a clear correlation of decreasing temperature and pH with distance from the source. Phosphate, SiO2, Ca-Mg hardness, Cl- and total dissolved solids (TDS) show little variation and nitrate and dissolved oxygen are undetectable. The water becomes cloudy white about half way down the outflow, which may reflect the precipitation of sulfate and carbonate minerals with cooling temperature. The morphology of the microbial communities changes from purple and green cyanobacteria filaments at the source, to white filaments at the outflow and finally to mat with trapped gas (O2?) bubbles toward the cooling pond.
note
From - Undergraduate Research Day 2009 - Celebration of Research - Abstracts
Subject
Hot Springs State Park

Subject
bacterial communities

Related Item:series Title Information
Undergrauate Research Day 2009

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http://digital.uwyo.edu/copyright.htm
Record Information languageOfCataloging :Text(ISO639-2B)
English
:Code(ISO639-2B)
eng