Intuitiveness of Moral Intuitions

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Intuitiveness of Moral Intuitions

Name:Personal
Taylor Grandjean, Piper
Role :Text(marcrelator)
creator

Name:Personal
Psychology; Dr. Karen Bartsch and Jennifer Wright
Role :Text(marcrelator)
contributor

typeOfResource
still image
genre
Powerpoint/Pdf
Origin Information Place
Laramie, Wyoming

University of Wyoming
(keyDate="yes")
2008-04-26

Language:Text
eng

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born digital

abstract
People tend to respond more critically to moral disagreements than to non-moral disagreements, and attitudes toward moral issues are held with greater strength than attitudes toward non-moral issues. It has been argued that this is because our morality is grounded in automated moral intuitions established by evolutionary processes. According to this hypothesis, we don’t reason when encountering moral issues—our responses are emotive. If moral judgments are grounded in automatic processes, then moral judgments should be more accessible than non-moral judgments. Furthermore, the accessibility of a judgment on an issue should be related to the strength of the attitude toward that issue. This study employed reaction time methods to test this hypothesis. Contrary to the moral intuitions hypothesis, participants did not generally classify issues as moral more quickly than non-moral (in fact, they classified issues as personal the most rapidly, though participants did have significantly more negative attitudes towards moral issues than non-moral issues. Moral attitudes were not more central or important to participants than non-moral attitudes, although they were more extreme. One reason for these findings might be that participants reported thinking about personal issues significantly more often than they thought about moral issues.
note
From - Undergraduate Research Day 2008 - Celebration of Research - Abstracts
Subject
Judgment (Ethics)--Psychological aspects

Related Item:series Title Information
Undergrauate Research Day 2008

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http://digital.uwyo.edu/copyright.htm
Record Information languageOfCataloging :Text(ISO639-2B)
English
:Code(ISO639-2B)
eng